Talks don’t get better than this

We scientists [should] spend a lot of our time thinking about how to convey information in a manner that will activate an audience. Jobs’ introduction of the iPhone is a master class in giving a compelling talk. Jobs wasn’t a perfect orator — he had a odd cadence, was a little stiff at times, and wasn’t as warm as the best speakers. But Jobs had passion and you feel that in the iPhone keynote. It’s best passage:

This is a day I’ve been looking forward to for two-and-a-half years.

Every once in a while, a revolutionary product comes along that
changes everything. … One’s very fortunate if you get to work on just
one of these in your career.

Apple’s been very fortunate. It’s been able to introduce a few of
these into the world. In 1984, we introduced the Macintosh. It didn’t
just change Apple, it changed the whole computer industry. In 2001, we
introduced the first iPod, and it didn’t just change the way we all
listen to music, it changed the entire music industry.

Well, today, we’re introducing three revolutionary products of this
class.

The first one is a widescreen iPod with touch controls.

The second is a revolutionary mobile phone.

And the third is a breakthrough Internet communications device.

So, three things: a widescreen iPod with touch controls; a
revolutionary mobile phone; and a breakthrough Internet communications
device. An iPod, a phone, and an Internet communicator. An iPod, a
phone … are you getting it?

These are not three separate devices, this is one device, and we are
calling it iPhone.