GirlTrek is what’s next in [digital] public health programs

The New York Times blog, Fixes, featured one of my favorite organizations today. Girl Trek is the best public health program you haven’t heard about [yet]. Look, I’m a scientist, a wonk, a tinkerer. I’m technically inclined, and quantitatively oriented. I’m hyperbolic and excitable, but I’m not easily inspired.

But GirlTrek inspires me [big time].

Here’s a gross simplification — recruit nearly 60k women nationally, women who are mostly sedentary, who lead busy lives and who don’t [yet] take enough time for themselves. Link them with groups, comprised of women, similar and dissimilar, of all ages and backgrounds. Then, motivate them to walk. And walk. And keep walking.

Physical inactivity is one of the most pressing public health crises of our time. And yet, many of our public health efforts haven’t gotten the population moving. This is especially true in high risk groups, like Black women.

GirlTrek is different. They reach, engage, motivate, and inspire with an approach that’s organic, culturally resonant, and technologically sophisticated. My take?

“We’ve spent an enormous amount of money on research-based approaches to obesity prevention and treatment, and almost none of them have worked with black women,” says Gary G. Bennett, a professor at Duke University and a leading researcher on obesity. “One of the key predictors of positive treatment outcomes is really high levels of engagement. I’ve been doing work on obesity as it affects medically vulnerable populations for 15 years, and I don’t know of anything in the scientific community or any public health campaigns that have been able to produce and sustain engagement around physical activity for black women like GirlTrek does. Not even close.”

And, it’s working.

Their secret? Focusing on what matters to women today. Not the health benefits that might accrue in the far future.

“It wasn’t about looking good or weight loss or fitting into a certain type of clothing,” she recalled. “It wasn’t, ‘Hey, you fat person, you need to do this or you’re going to die.’ It was, ‘I love you and I want you to love yourself enough to invest in 30 minutes a day, to walk yourself to freedom like Harriet Tubman did.’ And that spoke deeply for me because my life work is showing up for other people, but I wasn’t showing up for myself.”

We researchers can occasionally have a bit of hubris (!) about what it takes to improve public health. But the data don’t lie. For some of these issues, we need bright, creative, and novel ideas that can work — at scale.

Look no further than GirlTrek.