What do we need from digital health science?

Not another app. There I said it [again]. The market is crowded and science can’t (and shouldn’t) compete on design, updates, integrations, marketing, etc.

So what is there for a behavioral digital health scientist to do?

Answer the tricky, confounding, unanswerable questions that are constraining the growth and utility of digital health.

Like this.

Vanessa Friedman wrote great piece in the Times last week about breaking up with her Apple Watch (I’ll take it). Amidst her litany of concerns was this:

Likewise…the fitness-app aspect — the tracking of my steps, the measuring of my heart rate, the telling me to stand up when I am in the middle of an article — seems more like a burden than freedom…I have worked hard to wean myself from a reliance on exercise machines telling me how hard I had worked…because I knew I was cheating pretty much all the time anyway and thus could not trust the results, and in part because it became an excuse to modify, or not, my ensuing behavior…But the truth is, I know when I am in shape… The watch threatened to drag me back into a numbers-driven neurosis, and that’s a temptation I would rather not have.

Her comments are no surprise for anyone who’s helped a patient to change her behavior (especially the masses who aren’t interested in the quantified self approach). It’s dangerous to treat anecdotes as data, but I suspect her experience is widely shared. I’ve yet to meet a patient who was motivated by the reams of data that we scientists like to provide.

So, how do we fix this? That’s the question.