Kinect for fun, not weight loss

(Note: I’m about to date myself).

As a kid, I was a geek pioneer. That’s right, I was part of the first generation of children to be transfixed by the beeps, blinks, and bouncing pixels of video games played on devices like the TI-99/4A, ATARI 2600, (remember that attached audiocassette “drive”?) and Commodore 64. That means I was also part of the first generation that considered staying inside as a reward, not a punishment. For us, there was a linear association between sedentary time and video game proficiency. And I was very proficient.

Every generation since has basically put us to shame. With advances in technology, screens have increased in number, and as screen time has grown, so have our kids’ waistlines.

That’s why so many were excited by the release of Microsoft’s Kinect (and the Wii). Many thought these active gaming approaches would be like those funky vegetable pastas — sneaky ways to get kids to be more healthful (still working on my metaphors).

A fascinating new study suggests that much of our exuberance was premature. The study found that adolescent boys (and only boys, unfortunately) burned more energy while playing Kinect games, compared to playing non-Kinect games or just sitting. But after a day, there was no difference in energy expenditure. This means that at some point, the boys were compensating for the extra exercise they got while playing Kinect.

Compensation is common when we exercise. There’s good science that we tend to eat a bit more after being physically active (and sometimes, more than a bit). Interestingly, in the study, when researchers offered the kids food, there were no difference in the amount that kids ate. This suggests that kids compensated, but we’re not sure how, or when.

TL; DR: Kinect is great fun. Nothing beats using a game as an excuse to hurl yourself around the room dance. However, if you want your kids to do meaningful exercise, turn off the TV.