Why buy a wearable when they’re [almost] free?

In this week’s addition of Another Day, Another Wearable, we present the latest offering from Pivotal Living.

c9464e_b76da95d89af4e8ea229a8b04a7edf6a.png_srz_384_390_75_22_0.50_1.20_0.00_png_srz

Wrist-worn? Check.
UI? Check.
Bluetooth? Check.
Hypoallergenic? Hopefully.
Price? Free (with a $12 annual subscription to their premium app … so that’s more like free-ish).

I’ve long been predicting that we’re going to see wearables (at least the non Apple variety) rapidly enter Commodity Land. It’s becoming more difficult to differentiate on features (although FitBit is trying), it’s hard to justify high prices for cheap innards, and all the action is in the software anyway. Now, for the dreaded self-quote:

I predict that we’ll see these things [on discount] lining the shelves at your local drugstore. Just like paper towels. — Me

Whoops, wrong quote. Try this one.

Commoditization … will redirect the market’s focus where it should be: on the software. After all, the challenge isn’t the [data] collecting, it’s the changing. Tracker makers have done an excellent job in developing cool tools for gathering data, but they’ve been much less creative in designing software that reliably improves people’s health. And it’s the software that offers tracker makers the greatest opportunity for differentiation. — Me

I haven’t yet used the Pivotal Living app and on first glance, I don’t see much that isn’t available in other apps. And remember, we don’t know if any of these apps or devices actually work. But, what’s important is that we’re beginning to see new business models for wearables that prize (and price) the software. If this business model catches on, I suspect that developers will need ways to better differentiate their apps. This might create opportunities for those of us who’ve been clamoring to get evidence-based approaches into the app market. Admittedly, that’s a lot of ifs, but I’m willing to play the long game because I’m convinced that focusing on the changing (vs. the collecting) will give us the best shot at using wearables to improve consumer health.