Am I taking a student in 2015?

It’s that time of year again. I’m a faculty member in the clinical psychology program at Duke. During application season, I get lots of questions about whether I’m taking a graduate student, as well as who (and what) I’m looking for.

Back when I applied to graduate programs in clinical psychology, I had an entire kitchen table full of brochures, letters, and file folders for each university. We didn’t apply electronically, so I had an assembly line with stacks of printed personal statements, letters of recommendation in sealed envelopes, and special sections for schools — like Duke at the time — that required extra stuff.

Some things change, some things stay the same. Then, as now, I remember wondering whether individual faculty would be taking students in my application year. I really appreciated those faculty who were transparent about their plans, so I aim to do the same. Therefore:

tl;dr: Yes, we are [probably] taking a student next year.

Now, a few pieces of totally presumptuous advice:

As most of you know, clinical psychology programs that adopt the scientist-practitioner model operate along a continuum from clinical-heavy to research-heavy emphasis. Duke’s clinical program resides at the research-heavy end of the continuum. Duke offers absolutely splendid clinical training. We have outstanding clinical supervisors and a diverse set of training settings. Our alums become very strong clinicians. But we remain a research-heavy graduate program. If you are primarily interested in becoming a clinician or are not sure about your research interests, then I would strongly consider whether a research-heavy program is right for you. My opinion: they’re probably not.

Next, when it comes to evaluating potential research mentors, fit should be your primary consideration. I cannot emphasize this enough. For better or worse, many graduate programs still use an apprentice training model. This means that you will spend at least the next four years working very closely with a research mentor to develop the skills necessary to pursue an independent research career.

Here is a universal truth about graduate study:

If the fit with your mentor stinks, your graduate experience will too. -Me

Look, we know that there are lots of good reasons to pursue graduate studies at Duke. We are one of the best research institutions in the country. We have the country’s most beautiful campus. We have the best men’s and women’s basketball teams in the nation. Our faculty actually play basketball. We have will soon have the best football team in the country. We have the best food and food trucks in the country. We have the best dance festival in the country. We have the prettiest gardens and forests in the country. We have the best weather in the country. We have the best chapel in the country. We have the most spirited undergrads in the country. Did I mention that I am an alumnus? Duke is an amazing place, but if the fit with your research mentor stinks, very little of this will matter.

In that spirit, here’s what I’m looking for. First, know that my team designs, tests, and disseminates interventions for obesity treatment in high risk populations. This means a few things:

  • We’re looking for those who want to learn how to develop interventions. We’re less of a fit if you’re interested in the causes or psychological consequences of obesity.
  • We work in real-world settings with high risk populations; for obesity this means socioeconomically disadvantaged and racial/ethnic minority groups. We’re less in determining what works for obesity treatment in highly motivated populations. We work in busy primary care settings, often far from campus.
  • We use digital health approaches. We don’t use paper, pencils, workbooks, food models, or in-person individual or group treatments.
  • Although psychology is an individual discipline, our research program is heavily invested in population health. Thus, I’m looking for those with strong interests, training, or work experience in public/global health.
  • We work on the public health challenge of adult obesity. We don’t work in eating disorders (although Duke has great faculty in this space). We’re getting more interested in work with kids, but will probably start with families.
  • Finally, when evaluating a graduate application, I’m looking for those who have demonstrated an ability to think big, articulate focused research questions, work independently, execute in the field, meet deadlines, work well with colleagues, and communicate effectively – all while knowing how to have fun.

Good luck and Go Duke!